STANTON CHASE/SAN FRANCISCO NAMES TECHNOLOGY REGIONAL PRACTICE LEADER

Steve Caliger | North America Technology Practice Leader

SAN FRANCISCO — Steve Caliger, a Director with the San Francisco and Silicon Valley offices of Stanton Chase, has been named North America Regional Practice Leader for the Technology Industry Practice Group.

The announcement was made by Paul Herrerias, Managing Director of the San Francisco and Silicon Valley offices.  Stanton Chase is a global, retained executive search firm with more than 70 offices in 45 countries.

“Steve has distinguished himself as a leader in our growing technology practice,” said Herrerias. “Our technology practice is one of the most well regarded in the area, and much of that recognition is the result of his work with companies in this sector. In addition to Steve’s work in San Francisco and Silicon Valley, he has also developed strong relationships with our worldwide offices, assisting them with identifying top-tier technology candidates.”

Caliger has a large network and understanding of career and business success, leadership, sales, marketing, development, operations, and finance.  He   has held leadership positions with technology leaders, including AT&T, Cisco Systems, and IBM, as well as startups and early stage companies.

“I look forward to working with our worldwide offices in this capacity,” said Caliger. “The technology sector is growing at a rapid pace, and with this growth comes the need for strong leaders who will guide our client companies.”

Caliger also works in the Stanton Chase Industrial and Supply Chain/Logistics/Transportation Practice Groups.

Maintaining Focus to Achieve Your Goals

“GOALS…What you see when you are not focusing on the challenges.

A Parable on Careers

I set a goal for myself to qualify for the 2017 Boston Marathon.  Goal achieved.  It was not easy…in fact, there was time, effort, and some degree of pain.  But I had a dream, consulted with coaches and mentors, wrote out a specific plan, and then put in the work.  Gratefully, the work, planning, and coaching paid off and I realized my dream of qualifying by running the California International Marathon in Sacramento in goal time.

Then I set a new goal, this time to run the Boston Marathon and beat my previous marathon time.  Having achieved success before, I got a little laid-back in my pursuit of this new goal.  Distractions and set-backs became too common during my training.  One week I caught myself about to give up on meeting my daily training goal, when a fallen tree blocked my trail.  Turning back would have cut my run  short by about 4 miles.

Whoa! Large tree blocking my path.

Focus on this spot!

At first, I turned back.  Then I caught myself…how easy to lose sight of my goal.  I needed to run another 4 miles to stay true to my goal workout.  I reset my gaze on the fallen tree, examined it from different angles, and squinted for signs of the old trail on the other side.  Voila!

Upon determined inspection, I first saw the old trail, and then discovered a way through to it.

With a little extra effort, re-dedication to my goals, committed focus and determination, I made my way past this obstacle and continued my journey to success.  Having persisted and prevailed, I found new confidence in the pursuit of my goal and staying true to my workout.

Persistent focus unveils new pathways.

Next I was to run 19 miles on paved roads, and I attacked my work with renewed vigor.  I’ve since encountered more obstacles and challenges, but am stronger in my conviction, more confident I can overcome, and more determined in my commitment to my training and eventual success in achieving my goal!

I also am proud to say that in April of 2017 I successfully finished the Boston Marathon.  In fact, I re qualified to run it again next year.

What challenges are you facing in successfully achieving your goals?  Are you focusing on those challenges, or your goals? Where have you successfully overcome challenges and “found your path“?  How can you use this story as a parallel for staying focused on achieving success for yourself and your team?

Wishing you much continued focus and career success!

10 Truths Wise People Know (But Don’t Talk About)

coachingWhen executives are in career transition, or feel like they should be in transition, they call me for advice and counsel. They may be feeling stressed about where they are in life, their careers, families, retirement planning, social status, real estate success, or maybe educational pursuits. They may be frustrated with their bosses or coworkers or otherwise feeling victimized at work. My advice often sounds similar to this list of “10 Truths” Shannon Kaiser listed on her website post. As leaders, we are responsible for healthy teammates in body, mind, and spirit, and benefit from reminders like these below.

Here are 10 life lessons wise people have figured out but most likely won’t talk about:

1. There are no mistakes, only growth.

2. You will keep repeating the same patterns until you get the lesson.

3. Whatever you believe about yourself on the inside is manifested on the outside.

4. The more you approve of yourself, the less you need others’ approval.

5. All situations are pathways instead of problems.

6. Things don’t happen to you — they happen for you.

7. There is no “there” to get to — it never ends.

8. Where you are today is preparing you for tomorrow. Everything is connected.

9. You will always get what you need. It might not be what you want, but it is always exactly what you need.

10. What you make of your life is up to you.Illustration 5

Reflecting on these truths often reduces stress, and puts one back in control of their life. Once in control, then get relevant, qualified counsel and put that advice into action to achieve the results and life you desire. As you do this, you can then lead others through their stressful times and help them to be more productive team members at work.

This is one more way for you to be a more effective leader of a high-performance team, and thus builder of successful organizations.